Posted on

Cumming GA Lawn Aeration

Cumming GA Aeration

Lawnshavers offers Bermuda, Fescue, and Zoysia aeration service throughout Cumming, GA and surrounding Forsyth County.

Request An Aeration Quote

What is Lawn Aeration?

The dictionary lists aeration as “exposing the action or effect of air, or causing air to circulate through.” That is exactly what aeration is for your lawn – exposing the action or effect of air on your soil. Lots of products and substances might be aerated for various purposes. Wine, grain, and fish tanks all benefit from the process of moving air through them.

For our purpose we will be discussing aerating your lawn or turf, and to provide a more practical definition, we will be discussing the process of creating holes in your soil that provide an assortment of benefits to your lawn.

Why Aerate Your Lawn?

When your soil becomes compacted (compressed), water and nutrients do not travel through the soil as well. It can prevent adequate root growth and nutrient uptake in your plants. In addition, thatch, which is a collection of organic debris that gathers between your green grass growth and the soil, becomes unhealthy if it is deeper than ½ to ¾ inch.

Regardless of your grass type, the process of aeration provides specific benefits for turf health by relieving the effects of compacted soil. It stimulates the decomposition of thatch material.  Water and air, and thus nutrients, will travel better through the soil, and in turn your lawn will grow more vigorously.

How Do You Know When Aeration Is Needed?

Determining an aeration schedule depends on the type of grass you have. For our purposes we will discuss aeration for the three main grasses Lawnshavers manages in the area which are Bermudagrass, Zoysiagrass, and Fescue.

As a general rule, aeration is appropriate when your soil becomes impacted or when thatch becomes to thick. The frequence of aeration would depend on the use of turf.  You aerate a ball field more frequently than a lawn that is rarely walked on.

When To Aerate Bermudagrass & Zosiagrass

At minimum, aerate a seldom traveled Bermudagrass lawn at least once every three years. On a heavily compacted Bermudagrass turf, aeration more than once a year would be reasonable. For most lawns that receive recurring lawn service with commercial mowers, we recommend one aeration per year. This recommendation applies for both Bermudagrass and Zoysiagrass. The timing of aeration for both grasses is also the same –  you would want to aerate when the grass is growing fast, usually early summer.

When to Aerate A Fescue Lawn

Aeration for fescue follows the opposite schedule than Bermuda or Zoysiagrass. For fescue, your best months to aerate are generally March, April, and September-November. Avoid aeration when temperatures are likely to fall below freezing and June through August.

Types of Aerators

Spike Aerators

As a general rule, you’ll find two main categories of aerator – spike aerators and a plug aerators. A spike aerator is pretty much any device designed to poke holes in your lawn. You might have seen “aeration shoes” on a late night infomercial with spikes on them. Usually, the commercial advises you to wear them while mowing. These are a typical example of a spike aerator. The idea behind spike aeration, while good in theory, is less than ideal. Spike aerators may actually cause more compaction in the soil than they alleviate.

Plug Aerators

With a plug aerator, instead of putting a spike into the ground, a plug of dirt (usually 2” to 3” and about .5” diameter) is pulled from the soil and deposited on top of your lawn. The opening created by pulling this plug allows the compacted soil to break apart and loosen throughout the lawn. It also helps expedite the break down of thatch from the surface of the soil.

Plug aerators are the type of aerator any professional landscaper or lawn care company will use. Tow behind units can be purchased for a few hundred dollars, but a professional would use a powered aerator. New powered aerators generally cost between $3,000 to $10,000 per unit.

How To Aerate Your Lawn

Before aerating our lawn, make sure it’s moist. Not wet, obviously, but attempting to aerate a dry, compacted lawn will not be effective.

Call your 811 locator service to mark public utilities. If you have a sprinkler system you’ll need to mark sprinkler heads and any known lines yourself. These water lines are not a public utility. Unfortunately, you may not know where your actual sprinkler lines are. Note: An aerator can cause damage to improperly buried irrigation lines. In most cases, they are probably deep enough but a reputable lawn care company will expect you to bear the cost of such damage. A lawn service provider cannot know if they were installed deeply enough or not.

Assuming you have a powered aerator, which you can rent from stores like Home Depot, you’ll make passes in various directions across your lawn. You will likely make multiple passes over the same areas to insure adequate plug removal.

After aeration, allow the plugs to dry out. Once dry, you can break the plugs by mowing over them or using any common hand tools.

How To Hire Someone To Aerate For You

Many lawn maintenance companies and fertilization companies will offer aeration services. If you’d like an aeration quote from Lawnshavers, send us a quote request from our homepage.